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  #1  
Old 10-30-2009, 12:53 PM
manxman
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Default Progress RSB - GE8 Install Tips - EASY!!!

DISCLAIMER: If you perform the following procedures, you do so at your own risk, and you assume all liability. Neither I nor hondafitforums.com assume or accept liability for mistakes that you may make.

Also, I asked Progress Auto to review this guide, and they agree with my statements below:

Progress Auto warns you in their instruction sheet that installation of this RSB should only be done "by a qualified, licensed mechanic experienced in the installation and removal of suspension components".

Tools required:
Shown: hydraulic floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks, metric socket set, ratchet wrench, torque wrench

Not shown: 6 mm hex wrench (ideally, a driver-socket for use on a ratchet wrench. Alternate- 6 mm Allen wrench and a flat-jaw Vise Grips pliers to hold the Allen wrench, and a long, flat blade screwdriver., and two long zip ties (8" at least).. The hex driver or Allen wrench must be 6 mm. A 1/4" hex may fit, but it is too loose and will destroy the mounting bolts if you try to tighten them enough to mount the sway bar.

Click on thumbnails to increase size









1. Place a chock at the front and back of one of the front wheels. Use the floor jack and the jacking point between the rear wheels to raise the back of the car as far up as your floor jack will go. Place the jack stands at the frame edge lifting points just ahead of the rear wheels. Lower the car onto the jack stands, and move the floor jack out of the way. Now remove both rear wheels.



2. On the inside edge of each end of the rear axle beam, at the inner radius of the spring seat, the brake line is held with a small hard rubber "tensioner" that slides into the U-shaped slot machined into the sheet metal of the spring seat. Firmly grip the rubber clip, pull it out of the metal slot, and let the brake line just hang there. This is important- it will give you slack in the brake line to allow the axle to sag down all the way in the next step



3. Position and raise your floor jack under the spring seat on the left side of the car, and raise the axle until it is held up with a little tension. Remove the lower shock absorber bolt from the axle mounting bracket, and pull the lower shock out of the bracket. Repeat this procedure on the right side of the car. Let the axle sag downward as you lower the jack and move it out of the way.

4. The Progress instructions tell you to remove the springs while installing the sway bar. I am telling you that this is NOT NECESSARY, and SHOULD NOT BE DONE.

(There is almost no slack left in the tiny plastic brake lines. If you completely remove the springs, you may pull too hard on the brake lines and damage them). This job can easily be done without spring removal.

Simply insert your screwdriver under each rubber pad on the bottom of each spring, lever it up enough to clear the cone-shaped spring seat, and shift the bottom of the spring to the OUTSIDE of the spring seat. This will give you PLENTY of room to insert and tighten the three mounting bolts. The bolts go through the holes in the INBOARD radius of the axle spring seat.

5. Place the sway bar under the car on the ground, with the flat surface of the mounting brackets facing up and to the rear of the car, and the long straight sway bar aligned with the rear axle beam.

In the bolt holes of the sway bar mounting bracket, farthest to the rear, insert a zip tie, run it through the rear bolt hole in the axle spring seat, and snug both sides of the sway bar up to the axle, letting the front part of the bar just hang down.

Put the front two mounting bolts into the spring seat holes on each side of the axle.



6. With your most nimble hand, hold one of the nylock nuts, place a washer on the flat side of the nut, raise the front of the sway bar until the mounting bolts drop through the holes in the sway bar bracket, and gently turn the nut and washer until the nut is engaged by a few threads. Repeat for the second bolt, and then repeat on the other side of the axle.

Now cut and remove the zip ties and start the last bolt/washer/nut on each side of the sway bar.
Using whatever kind of 6 mm hex driver you have (driver socket, Allen wrench held in a Vise Grips), carefully fit the hex driver into the head of each of the mounting bolts, and use your ratchet wrench to tighten the nuts until they are fairly snug. Repeat for all bolts/nuts/washers.

Now with your torque wrench set to 38-42 ft/lbs, using the same procedure with the hex driver, torque all of the fasteners. Hold the hex driver in the socket in the bolts heads carefully and firmly to avoid damage to the bolt heads.

The Progress bar follows the contours of the rear axle beam very closely, and only stands away from the rear surface of the axle by a distance of about 1/4".




Reposition the springs and pads over the conical spring seat and wiggle the springs to be sure that they are settled into the top and bottom seats.

7. Raise each side of the axle with the floor jack enough to position the lower shock absorber mounting eyes aligned with the bolt holes in the axle brackets. CAREFULLY thread the shock bolts into the threaded hole (the fine threads are very easy to damage with cross-threading. Tighten the shock bolts to 40 ft/lbs. with the torque wrench. Replace each of the brake line tensioner rubber clips into the slots in the spring seats.

8. Replace the rear wheels and torque the lug nuts properly. Raise the car off the jack stands with your floor jack, remove the stands, and lower the car. Remove your wheel chocks.

All of your work has changed your car from a Fit to a "Piper Cub" airplane. Go take it for a flight down the twistiest road you can find


Last edited by manxman; 11-10-2009 at 10:57 AM.
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  #2  
Old 10-30-2009, 10:24 PM
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claymore claymore is offline
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Good one Dave. Good to see it finally on the car after the long wait

Some good advice on the installation for other members to follow. Now all we need is a road test report on your zooming around with your new ground hugging Fit
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Old 10-31-2009, 08:24 AM
manxman
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Thanks John, but I wrote the review/test drive report already, before the install guide. The difference between a stock and Progress modified GE is even better than the results on the GD. And after hundreds of posts on the GD bar, we all know how good that mod was/is. GE owners will LOVE this bar! At least, the owners who do not want soft, sloppy, squashy, unstable rear suspension will.
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  #4  
Old 11-05-2009, 03:39 PM
ekonetics ekonetics is offline
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Great review of the Progress RSB. Looks like you have a way with words, since I can't really explain the feeling of the UR RSB but its the same thing. Well worth the money either way you go Ultra racing or Progress.
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Old 11-05-2009, 04:01 PM
manxman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ekonetics View Post
Great review of the Progress RSB. Looks like you have a way with words, since I can't really explain the feeling of the UR RSB but its the same thing. Well worth the money either way you go Ultra racing or Progress.
Thanks a lot Eric. When I am pleased with the quality of a manufacturer, I am EXTREMELY loyal. Although I wanted to improve the Fit's handling and was going nuts waiting for Progress, over the last entire year, to get something shipped, I was not even tempted to try the UR product. Nothing against that brand, but I would much rather buy hardware from a proven, U.S. (and Californian) source.

I was happy to see the stock RSB as a standard feature of the Sport models, and felt that it provided an improvement in handling over a stock GD Sport. But in stock form, my new GE just didn't have the magic that I was used to with the Progress bar. I have to say that I was a little worried about possible overkill by adding another bar to the existing stock one. But I forgive Progress for the year of delay, because they did their design work perfectly.

Elderly drivers trading in their Lincoln Town Car in the clunker program probably would not buy MY Fit because it is somewhat more stiff overall, in its ride characteristics, than a stock Sport. Maybe the grandparents wouldn't buy the Fit anyway. I don''t blame Honda for making do with a RSB that is ultimately too weak. But for the real drivers , every Honda Fit NEEDS a good RSB to get the real fun out of the car.

Last edited by manxman; 11-10-2009 at 11:02 AM.
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  #6  
Old 11-05-2009, 04:43 PM
ekonetics ekonetics is offline
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I was going to wait for the Progress RSB since I have heard good things before about it, but given the opportunity to have something now instead of later sounded much better. My rear end has been stiffened up a lot and now I need to stiffen up the front some. I think the RSB was the best money spent for me thus far since it has made driving so much more enjoyable since I like to push my car a little around twisty roads I find on my commute.
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Old 11-05-2009, 05:12 PM
manxman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ekonetics View Post
I was going to wait for the Progress RSB since I have heard good things before about it, but given the opportunity to have something now instead of later sounded much better. My rear end has been stiffened up a lot and now I need to stiffen up the front some. I think the RSB was the best money spent for me thus far since it has made driving so much more enjoyable since I like to push my car a little around twisty roads I find on my commute.
Eric,
In your place, without my Progress experience, I probably would have done exactly the same. The only thing that I am still looking for and have not found is polyurethane bushings for the front, factory sway bar. I have been watching the posts, and the web sites for after-market bushings, but never saw anything being offered for the GD's, and now am watching for mention concerning the GE's. That's the only thing that I believe will get us to the ultimate in handling, but that's just my definition of handling (as a mountain dweller). I appreciate your posts here (and there).

Dave
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Old 11-05-2009, 07:35 PM
ekonetics ekonetics is offline
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I just e-mailed Energy Suspension about bushings, so hopefully we get good news back.
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Old 11-05-2009, 07:46 PM
manxman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ekonetics View Post
I just e-mailed Energy Suspension about bushings, so hopefully we get good news back.
I have watched their site, and monitored other posts like yours, for three years. No good news yet. Probably because our market is too small to pay for R&D. But LMK if there is a change, please!
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Old 11-05-2009, 07:53 PM
ekonetics ekonetics is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manxman View Post
I have watched their site, and monitored other posts like yours, for three years. No good news yet. Probably because our market is too small to pay for R&D. But LMK if there is a change, please!
Yeah after looking through their website and searching around on FF, I am very doubtful about getting some from them.
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